Florida Hunter Safety Course

 

Venomous Snakes

Eastern Diamondback Rattlesnake

Eastern Diamondback Rattlesnake

The diamondback rattlesnake has a distinctive pattern of yellow-bordered, diamond-shaped body markings. Brittle, button-shaped segments form a rattling mechanism at the end of the tail. The head is much wider than the neck. This is a very dangerous snake due to its large size, quantity of venom, aggressive defensive tactics and tremendous striking speed.

 

Pygmy Rattlesnake

Pygmey

The pygmy rattlesnake is the smallest of the pit vipers, but the most aggressive Florida rattlesnake. It has a reddish line down the center of the back along with a row of prominent dark round spots; these are bordered by a lighter ring. It is found in every county in the state. Most pygmy rattlers measure less than 18 inches in length. They feed on small frogs, lizards, mice and other snakes. Like other members of the pit viper family, it does not lay eggs, but gives live birth to its young.

 

Copperhead

Copperhead

Florida is the southern extent of the range of the copperhead and it is found almost exclusively in the panhandle. The head and body of the copperhead is tan to golden brown, with alternately broad, light and dark, brown bands that form something of an hourglass shape. The head is moderately wide, usually with two round, dark, and spots between the eyes. The copperhead has a distinct odor, which comes from its musk glands.

 

Source: FWC Hunter Education Program


 
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